Thursday, February 7, 2019

Book Review: The Curse By Randeep Wadehra

Name of the Book: The Curse
Author: Randeep Wadehra
No. of pages: 165 pages. 
The format I read in: Ebook
Publisher: Self Published 
Star Rating: 5 stars. 

When I think of a political thriller, I always envisage something like The Perfect Assassin by Ward Larsen or Books by Tom Clancy. But then they don't fit into our Desi model. That downright corruption - that rotting of roots that is slowly spreading across our nation and we the people of India are but silent spectators. This is exactly the raw nerve that Randeep Wadehra's book, The Curse, has caught on. 

It's a story of revenge, of extramarital affairs, of imbecile ministers and of the Jwala (flame) that is burning in the heart of every Indian. The first thing that caught my attention about this book is the sheer rawness that makes your blood boil as your peep into the lives of  Daulat,  Chaupat, Kamini. These are the people who stoop to any level to fulfill their greed. Where elections are tempered with and men raising the questions vanish into the thin air. This imaginary society created by Mr. Wadehra is not so imaginary after all. It's a mirror, showcasing the deep-rooted greed of those in power. 

Though I would protest when the question "those who sit on power becomes corrupt" was displayed by Jwala.  But again this topic is so debatable and so personal, that as a reader I can only say that this is my view and you don't have to agree with me. If all of us think like that - when does this corruption end? There is not one place where money is not ruling. Whether in the electoral fields or business decisions or small competitions where the means of winning is secondary. The only thing that matters is if you have money - throw a few in every direction to live a happy and fulfilled life. Our ancestors would do it for God and we called it Dakshina and now that has transcended to our society and we call it corruption. What's the difference? 

The Curse has raised many such questions in our mind.  It has all the ingredients of being called a political thriller. Sex, Violence, Corruption in the world of the Rich and the Famous. A love story - if I can call it that - between the rich and the poor, where the drawn line eventually refused to be erased. But that doesn't stop the rendezvous between Kamini and Yodha. 

The ending surprised me. The massacre hit me hard. Falling in love with Saaya is easy though calling him the perfect man is a tad difficult. But Saaya is a thought process which I hope never comes true. But whether you believe in violence or nonviolence, none of us can argue that a radicle change is needed to covert this dystopian society into a utopian one. 

The only issue I had with this story was understanding Kamini's character. But then Kamini can represent anyone in society. But somewhere at the back of my mind, I continued to ask, why the heck is she like this. Only for greed? There has to be a deeper meaning to all this massacre. I think that made this book more hard-hitting. As an Indian, I felt more betrayed. Is this all that it takes to fire a few bullets, injure a few souls? Just this much? 

The biggest USP of this book is the sheer brilliance of writing by the author, Randeep Wadehra. Flawless editing by Dola Basu Singh. The dialogues are all hard-hitting and after some time I found myself chanting "Through peace, it's justice we seek! The hunter will meet the fate of the hunted and the mighty will serve the meek!

Interesting names, brilliant characterizations all culminate to make this book a fantastic read for those who love a political thriller where the author is not shy of writing very well articulated sex scenes to inhuman massacres.





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2 comments:

  1. Your brilliant and cerebral review of my novel mirrors my thoughts accurately. My gratitude.

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