Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Book Blitz: THE WOOING OF THE SHREW (The Thakore Royals #3) by Sundari Venkatraman




Print Length: 154 pages
Publisher: Flaming Sun (Indie published) 
Publication Date: August 1, 2018
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
Language: English
Available on Kindle Unlimited 
Genre: Romance

Dayanita Thakore was a prickly princess who didn’t care for the idea of any man getting close to her… until Prince Harshvardhan Singh Gaekwad turns up in her life.

Sparks fly even at their first meeting when the Princess of Udaipur clashes with the Prince of Baroda.

He falls in love with the fiery princess while she fights her attraction to him tooth and nail.

He woos her, beguiles her, cherishes her…

…while the princess feels that maybe he couldn’t love such a tempestuous woman such as herself.

But before they could cross the great divide and get to know each other, something happens, something terrible that might just blow their lives apart.  

It would be great if you can add this book to your TBR





Sundari Venkatraman is an indie author who has 35 titles (31 books & 4 collections) to her name, all Top 100 Bestsellers on Amazon India, Amazon USA, Amazon UK, Amazon Canada and Amazon Australia in both romance as well as Asian Drama categories. Her latest hot romances have all been on #1 Bestseller slot in Amazon India for over a month.

Even as a kid, Sundari absolutely loved the ‘lived happily ever after’ syndrome as she grew up reading all the fairy tales she could lay her hands on, Phantom comics, Mandrake comics and the like. It was always about good triumphing over evil and a happy end. 

Soon, into her teens, Sundari switched her attention from fairy tales to Mills & Boon. While she loved reading both of these, she kept visualising what would have happened if there were similar situations happening in India; to a local hero and heroine. Her imagination took flight and she always lived in a rosy cocoon of romance over the years. 

Then came the writing – a true bolt out of the blue! And Sundari Venkatraman has never looked back.

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Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Book Spotlight: Blind Certainly Is love by Reshma Ranjan


BLIND, CERTAINLY IS LOVE
by
Reshma Ranjan



Blurb

Neha Jaiswal is beautiful and intelligent—an alluring combination—but chooses to be a recluse. What works for her is her intimidating personality that comes with her success. With no desire to get into a relationship, the strong, assertive, and hardworking Neha manages to keep the men at bay—all except one.

Sumit Conrad, a super successful businessman, is an intriguing specimen of a man. Known to the world as the good Conrad, Sumit is actually a recluse who prefers only his own company, to the exception of his brother John and sister-in-law Sarika.

When fate throws the flirt in Sumit and the furious Neha together, sparks are bound to fly.

Will Sumit be able to convince the headstrong and opinionated Neha that what he wants is a long haul and not a passing phase?

Or will the stubborn and cantankerous Neha be successful in driving him away?

Will their love make them blind to each other or to their own flaws? Will this blind love ever find its way?

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About the author


Reshma Ranjan is a passionate romantic who loves literature and has been driven by the romance around her. She has made up her own happy endings in her imagination for every movie and for every book with a sad ending. 

"Slowly I started to create my own characters and situation, creating a world of romance and happy endings to my liking. But for my laziness, I would have penned umpteen numbers of stories with unexpected people meeting and falling in love and uniting for a lifetime."  

Also a voracious reader but for which she believes she could never have started writing. "If I can bring a smile and a happy sigh on at least one reader’s lips I will feel a blessed writer."

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Monday, July 16, 2018

Book Spotlight: A MORSEL OF DIFFERENT SHADES by S.K. Sanyal




A MORSEL OF DIFFERENT SHADES
by
S.K. Sanyal



Blurb

Sumitra Ghosal came all the way from Bankura in West Bengal to join the education service in the recently formed Bundeli State. During the period from 1956 to 1990, spanning more than three decades, she got shunted around small towns and semi-rural areas. The book is woven around her experiences on women teachers lives. She found for some teachers, cruel circumstances charting out the unknown trajectory, while for the others, the evil streak already present manifested itself rather blatantly during their teaching careers.

Ranging from the weird to the quirky, scheming to whimsical, there were all kinds of women for Sumitra to experience and continuously learn from. Bearing a religious bent of mind, Sumitra, a spinster by choice, didn’t fail to take cognizance of the bizarre instances of marital co-existences in the couples she met throught the story.



Read an excerpt

Sumitra Ghosal had stepped into the thirties. Young and hopeful, bubbling over with the excitement of yet another transfer, she arrived at Domod, a district town. The three successive postings at Putlinagar, Bajera and Sagar in the sprawling Uttar Madhya Desh (UMD) had done little to exhaust her. UMD had its capital at Lakshminagar. As distinct from other States, it had predominantly Government schools, private schools not many in number. This State was created according to the prevailing trend of creating smaller states out of larger ones. Rashtriya Daridrya Mochan Party (RDMP) was in power, their manifesto focusing on widespread measures for promoting education for women in remote corners. Sumitra, though, found the efforts not coming entirely from the depths of a sincerely dedicated state. It seemed to be RDMP’s propagandist move to gain more votes.

Sumitra found travelling in ramshackle buses and waiting at railway platforms for the few trains available at odd hours, quite an ordeal. Hers was the fate to move around insignificant remote corners in the heartland of India, where commuting was not easy; semi-rural people formed the stock of commuters. Sumitra, however, didn’t rue her fate; she enjoyed, for she was an optimist drawn by the hidden charm of the unknown places. And what a taste of independence in not marrying – she wasn’t anybody’s property. Her decisions were squarely her own. She had her own conduct or the way to what people say, religiosity; none could teach her the way to realise God. If, as a woman, she worshipped the deity of Hanumanji, let people laugh at her fasting or bratas on Tuesdays and Saturdays. That she got the strength of character by observing the rituals of her making was what mattered. That she wrote with her fingers, without making any impression, the names of Gods and Goddesses on her pillow before sleeping was her unique way to ward off any trouble.

She had a personality built up over long years of getting over the inferiority complex she had developed in her formative years. Neglected and over-ruled, she wasn’t permitted to go for higher education, as her parents wanted their nubile daughter to be tied in a nuptial knot. But Sumitra went on rejecting proposals one after the other until her parents got tired. She was finally allowed to go for higher education. She had a late start, but this belated take-off made her even more determined to be independent, even to take a curious, brave and adventurous decision to take up lectureship in the newly created state of UMD when her native place was in Santhal Parganas in the east.

The fourth and the youngest daughter of a businessman, she had had occasions to go to shikar and witness ruthless killings of sambars, tigers and other small animals or birds. In those times, there was no ban on shikaris engaged in indiscriminate decimating of wild animals. One day, she was seated in the jeep with her legs on the warm and still throbbing body of a fallen sambar. Touched, she took a vow not to have meat ever again. Thus, she was the only vegetarian amongst her non-vegetarian sisters. Alas, she had no brother, and that is why she equated the male visitors of her generation to her parental house as brothers and bestowed them with sisterly affection.

***
It was the month of April when nature attired herself in a new garb with little smooth green leaves sprouting on some trees, while the others had not yet shed completely their brownish yellow leaves. A mixture of dusty yellow fallen lifeless leaves under the massive trees and the seasonal flowers past their full bloom presented a spectacle of life and death. One had to step over the crispy fragile remains of what once was a prized greenery to get near the rows of pansies, zinnias, lilies and other flowers to see the minute tapestry of the multicoloured spectacle amidst the crackling dead leaves. The winter’s ruthlessness had made way for the pleasant breeze, dusty at times, that replaced the cold winds of February. It was a pleasant, beautiful, sombre and placid morning in a strange land when Sumitra joined the school at Domod as a lecturer. It could have been the month of July with blackish-grey clouds suppressing the bright onset of the dawn or the torrential rains drenching her on her first day of school; it could have been the month of December with its biting cold necessitating the full stock of woollen clothes. Nevertheless, out of all the random eccentricities of the transferring authority, she was slated to join the school during the best period of the year, and it sure augured well. A placid look came over her face when she saw the red cap over a green body, the gulmohar, topping the fresh green leaves of the massive tree at the end of the road leading to the school. The April bliss.

She got the first shock when she found the distance cut short abruptly. The school happened to be in full view, even as she was jostling through the crowd, manoeuvring the sharp cuts and turns of the street; an expectation of an ideal location of the school belied. Why this proximity? A school in a bazaar? How nauseating and depressing?

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About the author




A member of the Indian Statistical Service, S.K. Sanyal retired as Director, Central Statistical Organisation, Delhi, after having served as a statistician at Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata, and as a Professor of Statistics at All India Institute of Hygiene and Public Health, Kolkata.

After retirement,he served from time to time as a consultant with the National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, Delhi. As a UNDP consultant, he had short-term assignments at UN Statistical Office at New York, Malawi University, Malawi, and Central Statistics Office, Sierra Leone. Prior to those, as a sampling expert, he delivered lectures on Sampling at Fiji and Nepal on behalf of Statistical Institute for Asia and Pacific, Tokyo, and ESCAP, Bangkok. At NIPFP, he was deputed for poverty studies at Sikkim on behalf of the Asian Development Bank.

Besides numerous technical papers and articles, he has also published a novel, ‘Shifting Silhouettes’, and a real-life story, ‘Memories Unlimited’. He resides in New Delhi.

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Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Review of Lolita: Reviewed by Sundari Venkatraman



Sundari Venkatraman Reviews

This is the first of the “Bad Girl series” by the author. Dying of curiosity, I bought the book the moment it was released on Amazon.

After reading the book, I realized that this was one character that I would have loved to create as an author myself.

Lolita aka Lalita hails from my hometown of Kumbakonam in Tamil Nadu and that was another plus in her favor. The young woman has dreams of becoming the star of Bollywood and goes along with a stranger all the way from Kumbakonam to Mumbai, completely unaware of what awaits her there.

What I liked about Lolita was that she was honest enough to take responsibility for her actions.

The story begins with a bang when an accident occurs during the first meeting between Lolita and Advait.

The relationship between the two of them sparks almost immediately but takes time to build. The story is as real as it could be with both the protagonists sporting varied shades of grey in their characters.

I especially liked the rapport between Advait’s little girl and the diva of the silver screen.
I must say the author has come a very long way since she began with her first book, which was itself 5-star material.

VERDICT: Lolita does win the readers’ hearts

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Monday, June 25, 2018

Book Review: Captive by M. V Kasi

The CaptiveThe Captive by M.V. Kasi

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


I was not prepared for this book at all. When Nina gets kidnapped I kept on turning the pages as to what's going to happen next. Ms. Kasi kept me hooked to the pages with her sheer brilliant writing. The plot is intriguing no doubt but the way Ms. Kasi has done her character sketches is a marvel. A play with words. Ms.Kasi is proving to be very good with romance and suspense. I loved the mind game Ms. Kasi played - with her readers as well as with her characters. Every time I tried to figure out where this plot was leading to, the twist came with a bang. Kudos on such a wonderful writing. Looking forward for the next one.



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Sunday, June 24, 2018

Book Review: Groomnapped by Sundari Venkatraman

Groomnapped (The Groom Series, #1)


My rating: 5 of 5 stars


An unusual story of a groom who is kidnapped to be married. I liked the premise of the story a lot. As is the signature style of Ms. Venkatraman, its hot and short and the flow of the story is really good. Loved it. It also covers the evils of dowry system in our society and told in a lighted way.



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Saturday, June 23, 2018

Review of Rising from The Ashes. Review by Dola Basu Singh

Intriguing short read

Loved this unique take on the age-old Purana story. The writer has created a fictional character to justify the grey areas, which I found innovative. The writing is fluid, making this story an engaging, quick read.

Review by Dola Basu Singh


Our books are often discussed. But we authors don't seem to have any right to discuss the reviews. Reviews that mean a life to us for it not only connects us with our readers but also with our own stories. As seen from other's viewpoint. And viewpoint might vary. That's perfectly fine. Each review makes me understand my stories better and helps me grow as a writer. 

Rising from the Ashes was initially written as a prequel to my Knitted Tales 2 but after the influx of short stories, I have decided to make this into a short novella. My stories are fictional but with bits of truth in it. One thing I have noticed. Every mythological story has those grey areas where we don't have any reasoning. My stories start there. From that point where logic does not come in. A series of mythological fiction coming your way. All from my imagination.. or are they?

The first in the series is FALLING IN LOVE WITH CUPID.  Coming Soon.

amazon.co.uk: https://amzn.to/2nT1Vsc
amazon.com.au: https://amzn.to/2nYBl11
Free on #KindleUnlimited
Only .99c or INR. 49

Friday, June 22, 2018

Book Review: Unexpected Love : A Short & Steamy Romance by P.G. Van

Unexpected Love : A Short & Steamy RomanceUnexpected Love : A Short and Steamy Romance by P.G. Van

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


I loved the twist in this novel. Ms. Van has kept her audience glued to this short reads. Hot romance, sizzling scenes and a good plot. Couldn't have asked for anything more.



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Friday, June 15, 2018

Book Blitz: Killer Moves by Varsha Dixit



Killer Moves
by
Varsha Dixit



Blurb
Everyone has a secret. Aisha Khatri has many! 


Aisha’s life is seemingly mundane on the surface-she writes for television and takes care of her niece Kiara and her retired father. But when Kiara’s life is threatened during a modeling assignment for the famous Kabir Rana, once a suspect for his wife’s murder, the only way Aisha can save Kiara is by accepting the unique ability she has aggressively resisted all her life. 


But Aisha is not the only one with secrets. There are others who have secrets and will kill to keep them. Aisha is determined to protect Kiara even if it means placing herself in the crosshairs of a depraved killer who butchers beautiful girls and leaves them as grotesque displays. 


Is Kiara a target of a serial killer or is the killer closer to home-and Aisha’s heart? 


Who is Kabir Rana? An elusive and moody fashion photographer burdened with a dark past or a murderer who got away? 


How will Aisha save Kiara from a killer who is several steps ahead of an entire city’s police force? When the dead come calling, will Aisha answer? 


From the bustling streets of Goa to the beautiful palaces of Sirsa, Killer Moves is a fast-paced, gripping, romantic suspense tale with strong thriller and supernatural elements. 

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About the author


Varsha Dixit, the best selling author of six successful contemporary romance books. Her debut book, Right Fit Wrong Shoe was a national bestseller for the year 2010. Varsha was a part of the Indian Television Industry and worked as an assistant director and online editor. She considers herself a dreamer who thinks deep but writes light. Even though creativity is gender free,Varsha feels blessed and enriched to be a woman.Currently, with her family, Varsha resides in CA, USA.

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Friday, June 1, 2018

#BookReview: Vampire Witch by Eileen Sheeshan

Vampire Witch  (Vampire Witch, #1)Vampire Witch by Eileen Sheehan

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


This was a very interesting read. I loved the way the emotions of a young girl evolved in this book. Casey starts as an ordinary girl and soon is introduced into the world of vampires, mutant vampires, witches. Geo is one interesting character I could fall in love with. The conflicting emotions between the characters came out very well. Casey caught in the crossroad of whom to fall in love is beautifully depicted. This book is one definite read for all vampires book lovers. Will look forward to other reads by the author.



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Thursday, May 31, 2018

Book Review: Wicked Forest by E.J Bennett

Wicked Forest (Hidden World Book 1)Wicked Forest by E.J. Bennett

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Crystal was quite an interesting character. Loved the way her character grew and her discovery of herself as she walked on the path of love. It becomes a pageturner as I was hooked to the book to know what was happening in the Wicked Forest and if the Carmichaels were as bad as they were supposed to be. Levi and Drake are to die for and even I got confused as to whom I should cheer for. Loved the cover. Ending .. no comments since I am now waiting for the next one.



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Friday, May 18, 2018

Book Review: The Storyman: Sometimes Truth Is Stranger Than Fiction by Bhavya Nandakumar

The Storyman: Sometimes Truth Is Stranger Than FictionThe Storyman: Sometimes Truth Is Stranger Than Fiction by Bhavya Nandakumar

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


This is one short story that makes you yearn for more. Very well written. Short and left me wanting more. A tinge of mystery, supernatural elements makes this book a page-turner. I have only one thing to say to the Author. Please write more. If the trailer was so good, I wonder how the movie will be.



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Book Blitz: IF YOU ONLY KNEW ME by Divyata Rajaram


IF YOU ONLY KNEW ME
by
Divyata Rajaram



BLURB

If You Only Knew Me is a story of friendship, passion and intrigue set in Dubai, arguably one of the world’s most exciting cities to live in.

Rupali, Anjali, Dipika, Sakina and Monica are five NRI women whose lives are glitzy and exciting as they flirt with high society within the charmed social circles frequented by the Dubai expat community. Beautiful homes, designer clothes, shoes, fast cars and a lifestyle that is envied by all, there is very little these women have not attained. Together they have also woven the closest of friendships and must rely on each other to stay on top.

Appearances are deceptive, though, and often the people you think you know the best, harbor secrets too dangerous to be shared. When tragedy befalls, the investigation that follows opens an ugly box of secrets that will test their friendship and find them struggling to make sense of the madness and deception surrounding them.

Who can they really trust anymore? How far must they go in their fight for survival?

How long will their friendship last once the masks have dropped and none can pretend any longer?




Read an excerpt from the book...

Dipika’s head was swimming as she sat in Tim Horton’s, Mall of the Emirates, waiting for Rupali to join her. The only reason she had even fixed up to meet her was that she knew her mother had called up Anjali who would have informed Rupali.

“Ha … I’ve crossed over to the dark side, Ma. Too late to return home again,” she thought. The black coffee she sipped did nothing to clear the confusion in her head.

Dipika pushed her limp, dank hair out of her eyes, struggling to make sense of the menu in front of her.

That bastard was stringing her along, she knew it. All his false promises meant nothing, she thought wearily while gazing at the menu.

She looked up to find Rupali rushing over to the table.

“Dips, darling, so good to see you,” said Rupali, trying to sound upbeat and cheerful. She almost recoiled as she hugged Dipika.

The stench of body odor and some other strange pungent aroma permeated the air around her.

Dipika looked awful; her usual dark circles worse than ever, hair dank and limp, and lips cracked and blistered. She never used makeup, but this was truly the worst Rupali had ever seen her look in a long while.

“Are you okay, babe?” she asked in a soft whisper. The answer seemed apparent - she was not.

Dipika made a superhuman effort to sound and act normal.

“I haven’t been too well, Rupa. That’s what I had called mom about. Hope she didn’t worry you girls. I’m sure it’s nothing serious. I just haven’t been sleeping much lately and it’s telling on my health.”

Rupali was sure that Dipika was depressed about her father’s upcoming death anniversary.

“Listen, baby … you are going through a tough emotional phase right now. It will get better, I promise. Meanwhile, we are all there for you, okay?” She hoped she sounded more confident than she felt.

Dipika nodded listlessly. Poor Rupali, such a good friend, always looking out for her. Dipika felt a million miles away from her right now.

They finished their coffee and made their way over to a few shops. Rupali could tell Dipika was having trouble walking and put it down to her mystery illness. Psychosomatic symptoms, probably, given her bouts of depression. All she could hope for was that whatever it was, it would clear up and her friend would get back to normal.

Dior, Valentino, Lanvin; there was truly no dearth of high-end brands in the latest styles in the Dubai malls. The girls finally agreed on a stunning Chanel dress, stark and beautiful, in black and white. When Rupali tried it on with the blue turquoise earrings the shop assistant provided, she loved what she saw in the mirror. The hunt for matching shoes took them to the Shoe District where even Dipika was seemingly revived by the stunning collection of Christian Louboutin. Rupa convinced her to pick up a pair of strappy stilettos in hot pink with a gold trim.

Rupali hesitated for a few seconds before charging her card. Sometimes she felt guilty about spending Rohit’s money. However, he had always told her that appearance meant everything - sleek, sophisticated and expensive clothes were his natural choice and, now, hers as well.

Finally, exhausted with their shopping, the girls headed to the parking lot where Rupali’s driver was waiting for them. She asked him to first drop Dipika off at her apartment on Sheikh Zayed Road before heading to her own home.

On her way home, she quickly called up Anjali.

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About the author


Divyata Rajaram has been living and working in Dubai for the past fifteen years. An experienced financial service professional, she is also an accomplished singer of Hindustani classical as well as western music. If You Only Knew Me is her first novel based on NRI women living in the UAE, and offers a glimpse into their lives and the challenges they face in a foreign land.

An avid reader of crime fiction, Divyata lives with her husband, their daughter and a beautiful dog in Dubai.      


                          


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