Monday, May 29, 2017

Vandana Shanker, author of '1857 Dust of Ages', speaks to Sanchita Sen



Writing about the past, sitting in the present is a challenge, but its a mission well accomplished by the author. Read on to know more about this fascinating story, its author and what she has to say about this genre of historical fiction. . .

The greatest challenge is being true to the setting. Creating an atmosphere about which you have only read and therefore have a second-hand knowledge. Additionally, one needs to be careful of the way author’s twenty-first-century sensibilities impinge on the society and culture of the past, especially when creating the characters. I constantly asked myself ‘does the character seem too modern?’ ‘Is she/he true to the culture s/he comes from?’

Sanchita: An intriguing genre, a lovely tale and amazing reviews! That’s what 1857 Dust of Ages is all about. Tell us about how you unearthed this lovely story from the heaps of history? How did you get the idea and how did you go about researching it?

Vandana: Some years ago, while I was doing my research at IIT Delhi, a close friend was pursuing her research on 1857 narratives. As we talked and discussed our work, the interest developed. It brought back numerous stories, tales, Amar Chitra Kathas that I had read in my childhood about the war of 1857. We discovered that there are lots of British writers who have told the story of 1857 – in the nineteenth century as well as the twentieth century. However, the event is practically unexplored from the Indian perspective. There are no contemporary accounts of 1857 and very few fiction writers in India have explored the setting. The British work is interesting but of course, full of stereotypes.  So we often talked about writing a counter-narrative. That is how the idea was born.
I read a lot of novels, British mostly, some diaries, letters, and non-fiction accounts. One of the contemporary writers whose work has left an impression is William Dalrymple. I often returned to White Mughals and The Last Mughal while writing Dust of Ages

Sanchita: Tell us about the challenges of writing in this genre of historical fiction?

Vandana: The greatest challenge is being true to the setting. Creating an atmosphere about which you have only read and therefore have a second-hand knowledge. Additionally, one needs to be careful of the way author’s twenty-first-century sensibilities impinge on the society and culture of the past, especially when creating the characters. I constantly asked myself ‘does the character seem too modern?’ ‘Is she/he true to the culture s/he comes from?’ And often the answer was an honest no. So one has to walk a tightrope between past and present.

Then, of course, the bane of historical fiction, it becomes too lengthy and the little tidbits of information add to the volume of the novel. Editing is a painful process.

Sanchita: Trace your interest in history. Share with us about how you got interested in this subject?

Vandana: More than history, it is the historical fiction that I find fascinating. I believe that it is the best way to know history. Instead of dry numbers, statistics and dates, the stories leave an impact. They humanize history. There is also an aura of romance and nostalgia about bygone times. A good historical fiction always leaves one with bittersweet feelings. These are elements that I love.

Sanchita: The book cover is enticing, as if it tells a story by itself. What thought went behind it and as an author how important do you think is the book cover, given we tend to say, ‘Don’t judge a book by its cover’.

Vandana: In this case, I wanted to capture the aura of mystery, romance and of course, the very Indian-ness of the setting. I wanted to use some nineteenth-century painting initially, but had trouble finding one that suited the mood of the book. This picture, with its beautiful colour gradient, just fitted the story perfectly.

Despite the warning against judging the book by its cover, I feel that the cover is important. It is like that very important first impression – the first encounter that the reader has with a book. It is meant to capture the attention and at the same time, say something about the content of the book. So it is something every writer should put a lot of thought into.

Sanchita: Sneak peek into your next project.

Vandana: I am currently working on a historical once again, set around 40 years after 1857, moving between Delhi and the Himalayas in the north. It is set against the backdrop of the Great Game. But it is in initial stages.   Hopefully, I will have the first draft ready by the end of the year.

Rapid fire round (First thought that comes to mind on hearing these words)

a.      Fort - Red
b.      Rebel - Cause?
c.      Red - Favourite color
d.      Antique - History
e.      History - Stories


About the Author

Author Vandana Shanker

Delhi-born Vandana Shanker is the author of the series 1857 Dust of Ages, a historical fiction set in the year of the great uprising in India. A PhD from IIT Delhi, Vandana is passionate about history, storytelling and art. Apart from writing, she teaches literature and creative writing in Malaysia. She has also taught in Universities in India and Vietnam. She currently lives in Kuala Lumpur with her family and wants to travel the world. 

Her book '1857 Dust of Ages' is available at:

Amazon.com                    Amazon.in                    Amazon.co.uk

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Thursday, May 25, 2017

New Blog Tour: Just me, the Sink & the Pot by Sudesna Ghosh




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Nurture the child in your children, says author Anand Suspi

Author Anand Suspi

How and why has the experience of childhood changed in the past couple of decades and what are its pros and cons?

The age of technology has changed things in ways unimaginable, some good and several things not so positive. This is my perspective and one that children of today might disagree with (They could well be living their golden years of joy and imagination.) But from my point of view, technology has
subtracted more from childhood than it has added. Overexposure and oversimplification of the world has turned young minds into slaves of consumption and convenience - too many choices, reference points and relentless stimuli…

We are constantly assaulted by a deluge of data that no human mind can sensibly handle. Each day, the world is throwing more at us and in the process, taking away the time to savour anything. Nothing can buck this fundamental truth - The more the mind receives, the less the heart feels. I believe that as kids, our minds and hearts are at their expansive best before we grow up and filter everything through our realities. Our imagination is fertile and our dreams are larger-than- life. The daydreams of innocent minds is a wonderful journey and can only be experienced as children.

Unfortunately, technology has gatecrashed this and playing spoilsport. Attention spans have crashed. Simple moments of joy have become fleeting. Interaction with nature is almost non-existent. As Balki has put it beautifully in his foreword, “The children of today are more adults than the adults
themselves.”

My surmise is that while living has become simpler, life has gotten a lot more complicated, even at a young age. That’s unfortunate. Growing up years have to be flush with naivety, stupidity and curiosity. When we pull out phones or access the net for anything and everything, the charm of life is hugely diminished. Life cannot be a 24-hour live stream of a billion other lives. The challenge for parents today is to nurture the child in their children. That’s not easy.


About the Author

An advertising writer for over 20 years, he started with Mudra, Mumbai in 1995 and subsequently spent a large part of his career in Lowe Lintas working under Balki. He was the Creative Head of Lowe Delhi between 2007 and 2010. Currently, he lives in Gurgaon and is the co-founder of an ad agency called AndAnd Brand Partners.

Half Pants Full Pants is his first book, a sort of childhood autobiography set in Shimoga of the 70s and 80s. Given the era and milieu that he grew up in, it carries a flavor similar to that of Malgudi Days. The notable difference would be that every story is real and the characters are all in their mid-40s now, often reminiscing about the gloriousness of their growing up years.

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Blog Tour: half pants full pants by Anand Suspi




HALF PANTS, FULL PANTS
REAL LIFE TALES FROM SHIMOGA
by
Anand Suspi



Blurb

Half Pants Full Pants is a sort of childhood autobiography set in Shimoga of the 70s and 80s. Given the era and milieu that he grew up in, it carries a flavor similar to that of Malgudi Days. All the characters in the book are real and most of them are still in Shimoga, of course now in their mid-40s. Quite a few are from prominent families and are now active and important members of Shimoga. The book vividly captures the real childhood adventures of this generation of people in Shimoga. It’s a glorious reminiscence as well as a tribute to this wonderful town.

R. Balki says

“After Malgudi Days, I could never imagine that someone could create a childhood classic for adults to regain their innocence even for a few hours. Suspi’s tales would have made R K Narayan smile. Oh! That beautiful Kannadiga gene!”

Grab your copy @


Follow the tour @ Pinterest 


About the author


An advertising writer for over 20 years, he started with Mudra, Mumbai in 1995 and subsequently spent a large part of his career in Lowe Lintas working under Balki. He was the Creative Head of Lowe Delhi between 2007 and 2010. Currently, he lives in Gurgaon and is the co-founder of an ad agency called AndAnd Brand Partners.

Half Pants Full Pants is his first book, a sort of childhood autobiography set in Shimoga of the 70s and 80s. Given the era and milieu that he grew up in, it carries a flavor similar to that of Malgudi Days. The notable difference would be that every story is real and the characters are all in their mid-40s now, often reminiscing about the gloriousness of their growing up years.

Featured in New Indian Express


The Hindu


Times of India


You can stalk him @      

                    

   This Tour is Hosted by 



We Promote So That You Can Write 


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Schedule: half pants full pants by Anand Suspi




Your Name :Type of post :Date of Posting
ArtiSpotlight5/28/2017
Chittajit MitraSpotlight5/29/2017
IndySpotlight5/30/2017
Jasleen KaurSpotlight5/31/2017
Nilima MohiteSpotlight6/1/2017
Surbhi Sareen Spotlight6/1/2017
ArtiReview6/1/2017
Jasleen KaurReview6/1/2017
Ruchira KhannaReview6/1/2017
Ruchira KhannaSpotlight6/2/2017
Rubina Ramesh Review 6/2/2017
Deepali AdhikaryReview6/2/2017
JAYASREE ROYReview6/2/2017
ShaliniReview6/2/2017
Sundari VenkatramanSpotlight6/3/2017
Ahana Mukherjee Review6/3/2017
Deepali GuptaReview6/3/2017
Mahesh SowaniReview6/3/2017
Shilpa GargReview6/3/2017
amar naikReview6/4/2017
Devansh DesaiReview6/4/2017
Nilima MohiteReview6/4/2017
IndyInterview6/4/2017
AnkitaReview6/5/2017
Dhivya BalajiReview6/5/2017
Rakhi JayashankarReview6/5/2017
Nilima MohiteGuest Post6/5/2017
AnksReview6/6/2017
Geeta NairReview6/6/2017
Rashmi Review6/6/2017
Paromita GoswamiGuest Post6/6/2017
Aparna nayakReview6/7/2017
IndyReview6/7/2017
Reshma RanjanReview6/7/2017
Surbhi Sareen Guest Post6/7/2017

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Monday, May 22, 2017

Anand Suspi, author of 'Half pants full pants', speaks to Sanchita Sen


'Don't judge a book by its cover', they say! But we do judge, because that is the first thing one notices about the book- its cover! Read the author and advertiser's mind to know about the book and what goes into designing its cover. . .

I wanted something that immediately takes the potential reader back to the 70s. The coins do this in the simplest, most evocative manner. They also work as a metaphor for the two sections of the book – Half Pants and Full Pants. The overall look is illustrative of the modest, frugal times we grew up in.

Sanchita: We read about how you started writing a diary on your childhood and then one episode rolled into another and finally got shaped into a book. Do tell us about the trigger that got you nostalgic enough to sit and jot down the travails of innocent childhood?

Anand: The book is an accidental piece of work. One day, about six years ago, I sat down to write a page to convince myself that I could write beyond advertising. I spent an hour thinking of what to write about. Arriving at a topic itself was confusing. I then remembered a few childhood incidents and felt that this was a good starting point and I could easily fill a page or two. I started with one, moved onto another and kept rolling for the next 45 days. It was fun, nostalgia felt cathartic and unintentionally, I had put down a sort of childhood autobiography. The only audience I had in mind was my childhood friends.

Sanchita: The book is being compared to having the same feel as that of ‘Malgudi Days’. According to you, is that true? How does it feel to hear this?

Anand: It feels humbling, but not surprising at all. Balki was the first to read the entire manuscript and he compared it with Malgudi Days. Now that the book is out, a lot of readers have said similar things. It is true to a great extent, by default and not design. The notable difference would be that all the stories in the book are real-life anecdotes. The milieu I grew up in was so similar to the world of Malgudi Days – small South Indian town (Shimoga), middle class parents (dad was a railway guard) and Brahmin upbringing (God and temples, righteousness, academics, respectability etc.) From the setting to conduct to human values, there are a lot of similarities. Between the 1940s and the 1980s, the world hadn’t changed much.

Sanchita: Hailing from the advertising world, you tell us how important is the title and the book cover in ensuring sales of the book? And what thought went into your title and book cover?

Anand: An attractive design is important to catch the eye, especially for a debut novelist. It can be attractive in a thousand ways, but it’s important that the design represents the content. As far as sales are concerned, I don’t think the design will do much if the book does not capture the mind and the heart.

My business partner Harpal, a designer by profession helped me with the cover design. We went through various concepts and finally settled on this. I wanted something that immediately takes the potential reader back to the 70s. The coins do this in the simplest, most evocative manner. They also work as a metaphor for the two sections of the book – Half Pants and Full Pants. The overall look is illustrative of the modest, frugal times we grew up in.

Sanchita: When was the best time of the day for you to sit down and write about those fond memories of childhood that finally went about to become this book?

Anand: I used to write for an hour in the mid-mornings and an hour in the evenings around 7 PM. I would read the day’s work before sleeping.

Sanchita: Sneak peek into your next project.

Anand: Advertising is my livelihood and that takes up a lot of my time. I’ll hopefully get down to my second book in about six months. I have a couple of ideas and they are squabbling with each. The day one scores over the other in my head, I’ll start putting pen to paper. Writing a book (like most creative pursuits) needs a lot of commitment, patience and sustained energy. I hope one of the two ideas gives me all three.

Rapid Fire Round (First thought that comes to your mind on hearing these words)

a.      Innocence - Dogs
b.      Trains - Countryside
c.      Era – No internet and mobile phones
d.      Quaint - Forts
e.      Towns – Contentment


About the Author

Author Anand Suspi

An advertising writer for over 20 years, he started with Mudra, Mumbai in 1995 and subsequently spent a large part of his career in Lowe Lintas working under Balki. He was the Creative Head of Lowe Delhi between 2007 and 2010. Currently, he lives in Gurgaon and is the co-founder of an ad agency called AndAnd Brand Partners.

Half Pants Full Pants is his first book, a sort of childhood autobiography set in Shimoga of the 70s and 80s. Given the era and milieu that he grew up in, it carries a flavor similar to that of Malgudi Days. The notable difference would be that every story is real and the characters are all in their mid-40s now, often reminiscing about the gloriousness of their growing up years.

His book 'Half Pants Full Pants' is available at:

Amazon.com                    Amazon.in                    Amazon.co.uk

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Saturday, May 20, 2017

New Blog Tour: THE CASANOVA'S WIFE by Sundari Venkatraman


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Thursday, May 18, 2017

Author Probal Mazumdar throws light on coping mechanisms for lost love




According to you what would be the best coping mechanisms for a lost love? Can it actually be attained?

Yes. It can and must be attained!

The best way to cope with tragedy or trauma is to just let it fade away on its own, as much as possible. Feeling angry with the world and being disillusioned is fine. Crying is okay. Feeling vulnerable and helpless is natural. And so it is the same for lost love, I feel.

Different emotions within can be imagined to be different people residing within each of us. Mr. Happiness tries to hold the hands of Mr. Sadness and leads him towards his side. But most of the times Mr. Sadness drags and clubs down Mr. Happiness. It is a tug of war...

Mr. Happiness needs to be stoked, stirred, even coddled, to be the solution he is supposed to be. For the grief one sees in a lifetime, many questions arise and muddles up the mind. And for all questions humans have tried to answer it with the help of frameworks. Mr. Happiness tries to listen to the answers in all these frameworks.

And so some find the answers and solace in the framework of spirituality, some find it in a religion, some in astrology and some in science. Mr. Happiness chooses the framework that suits his/her rationale.

At the same time I believe when tragedy hits, being part of a group of friends and relations can help a lot. As much as freely expressing the pain and the vacuum one feels inside.

And in between the start and end of this stress, something takes place within some of our souls. Something silent, something beautiful, something unexpected. Like the body impregnated with a seed - like the necessity to write, or paint or learn music or the desire to engage with some arts. Or maybe even the wish to find new love.

If the lost love is not irretrievable, then one must attempt to find it back, whether he succeeds or fails. This is what my novel, “Key To My Soul” deals with.

And if the lost love is irretrievable, then one must shake hands with Time and choose a path that will bring back Mr. Happiness to his deserving throne, as soon as possible.


About the Author

Probal Mazumdar works in an IT company. He is an NIT engineer by societal pressure, singer by accident, guitarist by love at first sound, poet by soul, writer by passion, a world class badminton player in childhood dreams, rebel by day, recluse by night, a samosa in a family of laddoos, a Jughead at the dining table, a shameless and congenital dreamer. 

Oh! An arsonist too – when his wife is not around, sets his own house on fire with his little son. 

He won the FIRST prize in the All India Poetry Competition, 2014, conducted by PSI (Poetry Society of India). Click on www.indianpoetry.org/awardsgeneral14.htm

His other poems have risen too from cold storage into literary journals like Indian Literature (Sahitya Akademi), Wasafiri (U.K. Vol. 67), Acumen (U.K.), OtherPoetry (U.K.), Chandrabhaga Literary Journal (Editor Jayanta Mahapatra), Dhauli Review, amongst others.

He writes short stories too. This is his first foray into writing a novel.


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Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Blog Tour: Ponni's Beloved by Sumeetha Manikandan



The Schedule of the Tour can be seen here 

Ponni's Beloved 
Volume 1. New Floods 
by 
Sumeetha Manikandan






Blurb

Kalki Krishnamurthy’s Ponniyin Selvan is a masterpiece that has enthralled generations of Tamil readers. Many authors have written phenomenal books in Tamil literature after Kalki Krishnamurthy, but Ponniyin Selvan remains the most popular, widely-read novel. It has just the right mixture of all things that makes an epic – political intrigue, conspiracy, betrayal, huge dollops of romance, infidelity, seduction, passion, alluring women, unrequited love, sacrifice and pure love.

Grab your copy @



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Excerpt


“I have brought important information for all of you. That’s why I asked the noble Sambuverayar to invite us all here. Maharaja Sundara Chola’s health has been steadily deteriorating. I secretly asked our royal physician, and he says that there is absolutely no chance of his health improving. His days are numbered. And it is up to us, to think about the future of the royal throne.”

“What do the astrologers say?” asked one of the noble men.

“Why ask the astrologers? Haven’t you seen the comet that has been appearing in the sky, for the past few weeks? They say whenever a comet appears, there will be death in the royal family,” said another.

“I have asked the astrologers as well, and they say that the king might live for some more time. Anyway, we will have to decide who should ascend the throne next,” said Pazhuvetarayar.

“What is the use of discussing that now? Aditya Karikalan was made the Crown Prince two years ago,” said one of the noblemen.

“True. But before he took that decision, did Sundara Chola consult any of us? We all have stood by the Chola Kingdom with loyalty and have sacrificed our sons and grandsons in the battlefield. Even now warriors from each of our clans have gone to Elangai to fight for the Chola Kingdom. Don’t you think we deserve the right to be consulted about who should be the next heir to the throne? Even King Dasaratha asked his council of ministers, before deciding to crown Rama. But our Sundara Chola didn’t think it necessary to consult anyone…”

About the author


"Sumeetha Manikandan is a top bestselling romance author whose novellas ‘Perfect Groom’ and ‘These Lines of Mehendi’ (which was published as a paperback novel called ‘Love Again’) have been on the top of Amazon India charts ever since its publication. A bookaholic, thinker, feminist and a daydreamer, she reads across genres and is a crazy fan of history, romance and science fiction novels.

An avid reader of historical novels, she has been translating Kalki Krishnamurthy’s classic Tamil novel Ponniyin Selvan for the past ten years and hopes to translate more of his novels to English.

Sumeetha is married to filmmaker K.S. Manikandan and lives with her nine-year-old daughter in Chennai."

You can stalk her @        

            

Climbing The Charts

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Monday, May 15, 2017

Probal Mazumdar, author of 'Key to My Soul', speaks to Sanchita Sen

Author Probal Mazumdar


Authors put there heart and soul into their stories. And how exactly? Read on to know more about this emotional journey and much more:

But finally when Sidd learns about the sacrifice his father had made for him, by even putting his life in danger for his son, the meaning of fatherhood became clear to Sidd. That was a moment of transformation, of learning, of understanding the true nature of human bonds, of values, of family. Articulating these moments within the story got my eyes wet many a times. The emotions ran high within me and so they are very special to me.


Sanchita: As a debutante novelist, what is your take home from the reviews that you are getting for your novel? Also describe to us how exactly did you receive the first feedback of the book after it was published and with how much anticipation were you awaiting it?

Probal: The reviews so far have been quite encouraging. For a first time novelist, reviews are worth
in gold and mean a lot. At this point the appreciations for my book seem to be more than the criticism. I hope the balance does not tilt too much the other way. But the criticisms I have seen are valuable, and I wonder if there were ways to get those before the book release.

Reviews, positive and negative, are points to ponder on. When the book was first released online and in select stores, I was away from home and so had asked the publisher not to mail the author copies to me until I reached home. The first news about the book came to me from an unexpected reader who was my school junior and we had lost touch since we left school. He was one of the first buyers and received the copy of the book even before I could see how it looked. The sense of loss of not being able to feel the book in my hands was immense. I guess my friend could feel my unrest and so he emailed me a picture of my book and said the cover and design looked neat. Within a few days he had sent me an offline feedback and applauded the book. Needless to say, it was a terrific feeling.

Sanchita: Tell us more about the ‘letter from your beloved’ that got you started on this novel?

Probal: In an unusual morning, in 2008, Siddharth (Sidd), a lonely young man, receives a mysterious call from an anonymous caller, about his childhood friend, Hazel. He is told that she is hospitalized in
Jamshedpur, battling for life after a serious accident. Then the caller, urges him to come over urgently. The behest is due to the uncertainty of Hazel’s survival and due to the possession of certain old letters of Hazel the caller wants to give Sidd. Hazel was Sidd’s first love. Someone he is still unable to forget despite 17 years of separation. He ponders what her letters might hold. The letters are the crux of the story. They open up an eclipsed past buried in time that is riddled with dangerous surprises, trauma, twists of fate, sacrifices that exemplify true love and the real reasons for the tragic end of their childhood love story. The letters lead Sidd to Hazel’s past and contains the Key to her Soul.

Sanchita: When is your best time to write and how long did it take you to complete this novel?

Probal: Early mornings are the best time when the mind is free of clutter and fear. And I could manage only three days of that. The rest happened at midnight as that was the only time I managed after my regular office work.

The gap between the first chapter and the second was about 3 years. Yes, it was that long, because I had to travel abroad for work and so the writing went into hibernation. After I resumed writing, three years later, it took me about a year and a half to write it completely.

Sanchita: This novel is your baby and I am sure you love every part of it, but if you were to choose one best scene in the story, which one would that be and why?

Probal: The story revolves around relationships, father-son, mother-daughter, social issues, apart from the core love story. Fathers are often portrayed as heartless and ambitious figures. Their struggles, their silence, their sacrifices often go unnoticed or are taken for granted. But every father has a soft side and maybe even a soft core that the world does not expect them to display. And that is something that bothers me a lot. While writing the father son relationship, I wanted to highlight and bring a sense of closure, in general, on the delicate and often misunderstood relationship between a father and son.

In my novel, Sidd’s father carries weight in his chest for decades thinking that he could have been a better friend and a better father to his son. Remorse for losing his wife early, prevented him from developing a deep bond he wanted to have with his son. The grief carried him away so much that although he loved his son deeply, he could never display that side of him clearly to his son. And that made him feel guilty. But finally when Sidd learns about the sacrifice his father had made for him, by even putting his life in danger for his son, the meaning of fatherhood became clear to Sidd. That was a moment of transformation, of learning, of understanding the true nature of human bonds, of values, of family. Articulating these moments within the story got my eyes wet many a times. The emotions
ran high within me and so they are very special to me.

Sanchita: Sneak peek into your next project.

Probal: I would probably come out with a collection of my poems or my next novel, whichever is ready first.

Rapid Fire Round (The first thought that comes to mind on hearing these words)

a.      Past: Life
b.      Mayhem: my room in college
c.      Memories: childhood romance like the one in Key to My Soul.
d.      Sentiment: Don’t hurt feelings
e.      Death: Why the cycle of life and death?

About the Author

Probal Mazumdar works in an IT company. He is an NIT engineer by societal pressure, singer by accident, guitarist by love at first sound, poet by soul, writer by passion, a world class badminton player in childhood dreams, rebel by day, recluse by night, a samosa in a family of laddoos, a Jughead at the dining table, a shameless and congenital dreamer. Oh! An arsonist too – when his wife is not around, sets his own house on fire with his little son. 

He won the FIRST prize in the All India Poetry Competition, 2014, conducted by PSI (Poetry Society of India). Click on www.indianpoetry.org/awardsgeneral14.htm

His other poems have risen too from cold storage into literary journals like Indian Literature (Sahitya Akademi), Wasafiri (U.K. Vol. 67), Acumen (U.K.), OtherPoetry (U.K.), Chandrabhaga Literary Journal (Editor Jayanta Mahapatra), Dhauli Review, amongst others.

He writes short stories too. This is his first foray into writing a novel.

His book 'Key to My Soul' is available at:

Amazon.com                    Amazon.in                    Amazon.co.uk              

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Readers Ask: WHY WAS ARYAN SO CONFUSED ABOUT SHEFALI?

When I wrote this book, little did I know the about the mixed reaction of readers I would be facing. Some loved it, Some adored it and some expected more. And some called it a Bollywood IshStyle Romance. And exactly what I wanted to do with this novel. Who doesn't need that magical love in their life? 

READER QUESTION

WHY WAS ARYAN SO CONFUSED ABOUT SHEFALI?

Have you ever fallen in Love? When you know that the other person is just not right for you - yet your heart beats faster for him or her. When you know that the whole society will be against your love, yet you brave every antagonist who comes your way with all those feeling bubbling inside you. But the worst enemy of your love is you - yourself. 

Love is confusing - especially when your circumstances refuses to help you out. And Aryan suspected her for stealing something very valuable to his family - yet Love crept in his heart. I know I know, next question will be how can you love a person you don't trust. Will answer that next time. 

If you have a question, do pm me  in my author page or email me at rubinaramesh1973@gmail.com  

GRAB A COPY 
PAPERBACK COMING SOON

 

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Thursday, May 11, 2017

Women's Web event on 'Marketing Mantras in a Connected World', covered by Janaki Nagaraj



Women's Web came out with another edition of Breaking Barriers - a full day event for women entrepreneurs. This time the emphasis was on 'Marketing Mantras in a Connected World'.

Anju Jayaram, Partner and CMO of Women's Web, set the ball rolling into the day's events with an introduction to the topic . The first discussion was about 'Design Thinking' and what it is all about and how we can incorporate it into our businesses. Vidya Sankarnarayan, the co-founder and partner of Hyerlocl Design Thinking, took us through the various stages of this concept. It was an intriguing and insightful session.


"Design Thinking is a methodology used by designers to solve complex problems, and find desirable solutions for clients. A design mindset is not problem-focused, it's solution focused and action oriented towards creating a preferred future."

This was followed by a session on Market research and outsourcing of your content, which has to be shared on various social media platforms. If you have the money to outsource work, then it helps in giving you more time to concentrate and strategize on other aspects which will help your business grow. This was a panel discussion by Minitha Saxena, Head of Content Product Services, TCS; Niti Jain, co-founder of Qween, and Munni Trivedi the founder of Magenta. Well, this session was helpful to only those whose businesses can involve outsourcing.

Niti Jain, with Munni Trivedi on her left and Minita Saxena on her right

Building Resilience in a world of stress by Ambica Saxena, Managing Partner of YSC, was a session I enjoyed the most and it was the most interactive session, as all of us who were present could identify with the problems faced. It was well articulated that 'Resilience' is not about surviving, but about thriving.


Post lunch we had Naveen Bachwani, CEO, Thinkshop.in, speak about Building a personal brand - An entrepreneur's playbook. This again was the emphasis on using the various social media platforms to our optimum benefit, which platform offers maximum results and when to use them or how to prioritize them.


The last session of the day was a panel discussion about what failure has taught us. Moderated by Suman Kher, founder of Soft Skills Studio and the key speakers were Dr. Bhavi Mody, Founder and Director - Health and Wellness and Meeta Sabnis, Co- founder of Talent Terrain. This session was all about how to deal with failures and how to move on. This of course came from the personal experiences.

From L to R: Suman Kher, Dr Bhavi Modi and Meeta Sabnis

This was indeed a great endeavor by the Women's Web community to empower women. I will certainly look forward to many more events by them. And it is a place for great networking, as well.

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